Tuesday, December 29, 2015

Mesotherapy for Chicken Pox Scars

Chicken pox scars can have a devastating effect on the skin, especially if you get the disease when you are older. The scars can range from being slightly dark marks, to pitted dark craters to an orange peel effect.  The good news is that mesotherapy can help stimulate the dermis so recent scarring heals up faster and older scars lose their darkness and become less apparent.



The best-known sign of chickenpox is a red, itchy rash that breaks out on your face, scalp, chest and back, but it can spread across your entire body, even into your throat, eyes and vagina.
The chickenpox rash usually appears less than two weeks after exposure to the virus and begins as superficial spots. These spots quickly turn into small liquid-filled blisters that break open and crust over. New spots continue to appear for several days and may number in the hundreds. Itching may range from mild to intense.
It starts as a fever and a headache and twenty four to thirty six hours later pimple a pear on the face and body. They are filled with fluid and look like water blisters. These eruptions continue in cycles lasting from three days to one week. The blisters and crusts are infectious and itchy and scratching them can lead to infection and scarring. Once the scabs from the chickenpox sores are gone the person is no longer infectious.

The rash may be preceded by or accompanied by:
  • Abdominal pain or loss of appetite  
  • Mild headache
  • General feeling of unease and discomfort (malaise) or irritability and
  • Mild cough and runny nose the first two days of illness  

Who Can Get The Chicken Pox?

Chickenpox is highly contagious to people not immune to it and spreads quickly within child care facilities, schools and families. The virus is transmitted by direct contact with the rash or by coughing or sneezing.
A person who has chickenpox can transmit the virus for up to 48 hours before the telltale rash appears and remains contagious until all spots crust over.
In otherwise healthy children, chickenpox typically requires no medical treatment. Your doctor may prescribe an antihistamine or topical lotion such as calamine lotion to relieve itching. But for the most part, the disease is allowed to run its course.
Doctors sometimes prescribe medications to shorten the duration of the infection and to help reduce the risk of complications. This might be an antiviral drug such as acyclovir (Zovirax) or another drug called intravenous immune globulin (IGIV). These medications may lessen the severity of the disease. 

How Mesotherapy Can Help 

Mesotherapy can be used to puncture the skin at the site of the sore to stimulate it to grow collagen. The effect of the needle therapy is the breaking down of old scar tissue so the skin looks smoother. It works well on the crater-like scars but not as well on scars where the keloid tissue is growing abnormally above the skin tissue.
The abnormal color of the scarring is reduced because the micro-needling helps the skin shed its top layer of cells so it can produce normal melanocyte. Melanocyte is a byproduct of melanin, the substance that gives our skin its color.

For more information about The Pinewood Institute for the Advancement of Natural Medicine courses including course outlines, detailed descriptions of courses and information about upcoming training sessions, please go www.pinewoodinstitute.com.  You can also send us an email using our email form at http://pinewoodinstitute.com/contact.aspx or call us at 416-656-8100. If you prefer to fax the number is 416-656-8107 


Monday, December 14, 2015

Mesostherapy for Chronic Dermatitis

Dermatitis is an inflammation of the skin that produces itching, scaling, flaking, thickening of the flesh and sometimes it also color changes to the skin. This is a condition that can be treated by mesotherapy, with anti-inflammatory agents and nutrients injected just below the affected areas.  Mesotherapy works best on chronic, rather than acute cases of dermatitis because acute cases tend to resolve on their own within hours or a few days.

Contact Dermatitis

Symptoms of Dermatitis 

General symptoms of dermatitis are itching, skin redness, skin tenderness, localized swelling, warmth in the afflicted area and skin lesions or a rash.  The rash may weep pus or seem to sweat fluids. Blisters can also occur in severe cases.

What Causes Dermatitis

The symptoms of dermatitis may vary according to the causes of the condition –

Atopic dermatitis is a hereditary form of the condition that usually becomes apparent in infancy. It typically appears on the face, in the bends of the elbows and behind the knees. Often other family members have history of allergies or asthma when this occurs. It is also known as eczema and is easily treated by mesotherapy.

Nummular dermatitis is a chronic condition in which round coin shaped lesions appear on the limbs. It is associated with dry skin and also an allergy to nickel. Mesotherapy can help with the flaking and scarring associated with this condition.

Dermatitis herptifromis is a very itchy type of dermatitis  that is triggered by the consumption of dairy or wheat products in individuals who have intolerance to gluten or lactose. Blisters that crust over and ooze distinguish this type of dermatitis. People who are allergic to gluten may also have this ty

Seborrhea is a form of dermatitis that most commonly affects the scalp and it is also known as dandruff.

Chemicals used in bubble bath, laundry detergents, perfumes and cosmetics can cause dermatitis  or aggravate an existing case. Other causes are rubber, medicated ointments, adhesives, solvents, nail polish remover, preservatives in contact lens solutions, plants such as poison ivy and allergies to metal or metal alloys such as nickel, silver and gold.

Some types of aerosols such as bug spray can also cause contact dermatitis.

Treatment of Dermatitis


If the dermatitis is caused by an immediate known allergen or poison then your patient should be told to immediately and thoroughly washing the skin to remove any trace of irritants. Further exposure to known irritants or allergens should be avoided.

Regular MD’s will give a patient with long-term inflammation a cortiscoseoid medication to help treat this condition but often these make the condition worse as a side effect of a corticoseoid can be additional inflamaation.  Mesotherapy can offer a progressive, long term solution towards helping the skin heal itself and develop a resistance towards the provocation.

Symptoms can linger after a mesotherapy treatment with mesotherapy in which case Calamine and soaks in a tub with Baking Soda may tide the client or patient over until the next treatment.

Contact dermatitis usually clears up without complications within 2 or 3 weeks but may recur if the agent triggering it cannot be identified.

For more information about The Pinewood Institute for the Advancement of Natural Medicine courses including course outlines, detailed descriptions of courses and information about upcoming mesotherapy or cosmetic injection training sessions, please go www.pinewoodinstitute.com.  You can also send us an email using our email form at http://pinewoodinstitute.com/contact.aspx or call us at 416-656-8100. If you prefer to fax the number is 416-656-8107.